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NYU Professor Jeremy Waldron To Discuss “Foreign Law in American Courts” Sept. 10-12

WATCH THE VIDEO OF JEREMY WALDRON’S LECTURE, “DEMOCRACY, JUDICIAL REVIEW, AND ‘THE DISAPPROVING VIEWS OF FOREIGNERS’”

WATCH THE VIDEO OF JEREMY WALDRON’S LECTURE, “THE EXPANSION OF INTEGRITY:  TREATING LIKE CASES ALIKE (HERE AND THERE)”

WATCH THE VIDEO OF JEREMY WALDRON’S LECTURE, “LEARNING FROM OTHER COURTS:  THE RIGHT WAY, THE WRONG WAY, AND THE LEGAL WAY”

DOWNLOAD THE PODCASTS

Jeremy Waldron, University Professor at New York University School of Law, will deliver the Storrs Lectures at Yale Law School on Monday, Sept. 10, Tuesday, Sept. 11, and Wednesday, Sept. 12.  His three-part lecture is titled “‘Partly Laws Common To All Mankind’: Foreign Law In American Courts.”

The first lecture is subtitled “Democracy, Judicial Review, and ‘The Disapproving Views of Foreigners.’”  The second is subtitled “The Expansion of Integrity:  Treating Like Cases Alike (Here and There).” And the third is subtitled “Learning from Other Courts:  The Right Way, The Wrong Way, and The Legal Way.”

The Monday and Tuesday lectures begin at 4:30 p.m. and the Wednesday lecture begins at 3:10 p.m.  All will be held in Room 127 of the Law School and are free and open to the public. A reception will be held in the Alumni Reading Room following Monday’s lecture. 

In his lectures, Professor Waldron will discuss whether it’s ever appropriate for American judges to be influenced in their decisions by what they know of the laws of other countries. 

“The citation of foreign law by the U.S. Supreme Court in Roper v Simmons (the 2005 juvenile death penalty case) and Lawrence v Texas (the 2003 case striking down an anti-sodomy law) has proved enormously controversial,” said Waldron.  “It is time for legal philosophy to get involved in this controversy.”

Waldron said his lectures will explore jurisprudential ideas that might underlie the Supreme Court’s occasional recourse to foreign law, especially in constitutional cases.  He will do so by reference to the old Roman Law principle that every society is governed partly by its own laws and partly by laws common to all mankind.

Jeremy Waldron has been University Professor at NYU School of Law since 2006. Prior to that, he was University Professor at Columbia Law School.  His other academic appointments have been at Otago, Oxford, Edinburgh, Berkeley, and Princeton. 

He has written numerous books, including God, Locke and Equality (Cambridge, 2002), Law and Disagreement (Oxford, 1999), and The Dignity of Legislation (Cambridge, 1999).  He is the author of more than a hundred published articles and essays in legal and political philosophy, both contemporary and historical.

He was educated in law and philosophy at the University of Otago and received his doctorate in jurisprudence at Oxford.  He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1998. He has received honorary doctorates in law from the University of Otago and the Catholic University of Brussels.

The Storrs Lectures, one of Yale Law School's oldest and most prestigious lecture programs, were established in 1889. These annual lectures are given by a prominent scholar and deal with fundamental problems of law and jurisprudence.