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Vol. I


MASTHEAD

ARTICLES
Confronting the Violence Committed by Armed Opposition Groups by Ravi Nair
Abstract | PDF
Maya Aboriginal Land and Resource Rights and the Conflict Over Logging in Southern Belize by S. James Anaya
Abstract
Crossing the Border: The Interdependence of Foreign Policy and Racial Justice in the United States by Natsu Taylor Saito
Abstract | PDF
Treaty, Custom and the Cross-fertilization of International Law by Phillipe Sands
Abstract | PDF

NOTES
Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes?: Why and How UNHCR Governance of "Development" Refugee Camps Should be Subject to International Human Rights Law by Ralph Wilde
Abstract | PDF

NEW DEVELOPMENTS
The U.N. Environment Programme: Thinking Globally, Retreating Locally by Matthew Heimer
Abstract | PDF
NGO Proposals for an Asian-Pacific Human Rights System by Ralph Wilde
Abstract | PDF
Understanding "Hostage-Diplomacy": The Release of Wei Jingsheng and Wang by Dan Hari Osofsky
Abstract | PDF 
 


ARTICLES
Confronting the Violence Committed by Armed Opposition Groups by Ravi Nair
In many nations of the world the state is only one among several actors that perpetrates abuses against innocent civilians. Should human rights organizations move to criticize the activities of non-state groups? Is it important that only states have signed international human rights conventions, and how would human rights organizations avoid taking political sides? In addressing these questions Director Ravi Nair argues that any such criticism should be exercised with care, but sometimes is necessary if human rights organizations are to help create a more humane society.

Maya Aboriginal Land and Resource Rights and the Conflict Over Logging in Southern Belize by S. James Anaya
On November 29, 1996, the Maya people of Belize filed an action challenging the state's granting of logging concessions to companies seeking to work within lands with long-standing historical and cultural ties to the indigenous population. In this article Professor Anaya, who wrote an amicus brief supporting the Maya's action, explains the rationale behind the the suit and its relation to a global concept of indigenous rights.

Crossing the Border: The Interdependence of Foreign Policy and Racial Justice in the United States by Natsu Taylor Saito
Natsu Taylor Saito examines how violations of international law and perceptions of non-citizens can reflect and have implications for domestic racial relations. Professor Saito focuses in particular upon the little-known fact that during World War II, the United States kidnapped Japanese Peruvians in order to exchange them for prisoners of war held by the Japanese. She ultimately argues that blindness to the right of citizens abroad will inevitably lead to blindness toward the rights of citizens at home.

Treaty, Custom and the Cross-fertilization of International Law by Phillipe Sands
If an international norm and a convention, or a trade law and an environmental standard conflict, how should the conflict be resolved? Professor Sands examines this growing challenge and offers a number of insights and solutions.


NOTES
Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes?: Why and How UNHCR Governance of "Development" Refugee Camps Should be Subject to International Human Rights Law by Ralph Wilde
Various human rights conventions impose specific, and often expensive responsibilities upon states that are hosting refugees. Many poorer nations, however, are evading these responsibilities--and thus the considerable burden of fulfilling their legally mandated duties--by shifting control over the refugee camps entirely to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). As a non-governmental entity that did not sign the applicable conventions, it is questionable as whether or not international refugee law should regulate the UNDP's activities. This article argues that it does.

NEW DEVELOPMENTS
The U.N. Environment Programme: Thinking Globally, Retreating Locally by Matthew Heimer
The author discusses the future prospects for the United Nations Environment Programme. Once universally respected, the world's preeminent international environmental organization has recently been beset by political infighting, budgetary cutbacks, and organizational problems.


NGO Proposals for an Asian-Pacific Human Rights System by Ralph Wilde
This piece discusses the prospects for and innovations of a Human Rights Charter that was recently agreed to by various non-governmental organizations in the Asia-Pacific region, the only region in which no regional human rights system currently
exists.


Understanding "Hostage-Diplomacy": The Release of Wei Jingsheng and Wang by Dan Hari Osofsky
Recently, much attention has been placed upon the release of dissidents Wei Jingsheng and Wang Dan from imprisonment in China. Yet some argue that the human rights community will only hurt their own cause if they relentlessly focus on the release of a couple prominent individuals, while countless others continue to languish in jails or labor camps. The author addresses the reasoning behind "hostage-diplomacy," its pitfalls, and how it can be used to carry out an effective human rights strategy.

 

 VOL. 1 MASTHEAD

 Ahilan Arulanantham
 Submissions Editor
 Shahana Basu
 Submissions Editor
 Susan Benesch
 New Development Editor
 Karol Brown
 Technical Editor
 Steven Carlson
 Technical Editor
 Ann Collins
 Articles Editor
 Jennifer Coon
 Articles Editor
 Jonathan Hafetz
 New Development Editor
 Janine Kim
 Executive Editor
Hari Osofsky
 Editor-in-Chief
 Suzanne Perry
 Managing Editor
 Michelle Riley
 Executive Editor
 Lawrence Small
 Managing Editor
 Katherine Seay
 Notes Editor
 Eric Yoon
 Editor-in-Chief

EDITORS
Albert Jean, Fiona Doherty, Michael Durham, Jed Greer, Matthew Heimer, Natalie Klein, Nathan Limpert, Tara Melish, Radoslav Prochazka, Rose Saxe, Martin Stein, Fridolin Walther, Ralph Wilde