Overlay

Print/PDF this page:

Print Friendly and PDF

Share this page:

Simeon E. Baldwin Award

The Simeon E. Baldwin Award was established in 2007 and is presented by the Center to a Yale Law School graduate in recognition of distinguished achievement in law and business. Simeon Baldwin, both a student and faculty member of the Law School, was the leading railroad lawyer of his day and was responsible for putting in place the Law School's interdisciplinary tradition, which would propel Yale Law into the preeminent institution it is today. He was also governor and chief justice of the Supreme Court of Connecticut, and a founder and president of an astounding number of professional associations including the American Bar Association, American Association of Law Schools and American Political Science Association. Baldwin's extraordinary career embodies the distinguished service that the Center wishes to recognize and honor in award recipients.

Award Recipients:

2013: 
Gandolfo V. DiBlasi '78, Partner, Sullivan & Cromwell LLP

2012: Stephen Fraidin '64, Partner, Corporate, Kirkland & Ellis LLP

2011: Eugene A. Ludwig ’73, Chairman and Founder, Promontory Financial Group, and U.S. Comptroller of the Currency, 1993-98

2010: Hon. William B. Chandler III ’79 LLM, Chancellor, Delaware Court of Chancery

2009: Arthur Fleischer, Jr. '58, Senior Partner, Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson

2008: Ralph K. Winter '60, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, Professor (Adjunct) of Law and formerly William K. Townsend Professor of Law, Yale Law School.

2007: Robert Todd Lang '47, Chairman of the YLS Center for the Study of Corporate Law's Board of Advisors, and Senior Partner, Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP.


2013Gandolfo V. DiBlasi '78, Partner, Sullivan & Cromwell LLP

At the presentation of the award, Judge Ralph K. Winter '60, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, Professor (Adjunct) of Law and formerly William K. Townsend Professor of Law, Yale Law School, stated: "Vince has certain precious qualities, and in great abundance.  He is down-to-earth and lacks the pomposity so often found in our profession -- often as the

Dean Post '77, Roberta Romano '80 and the DiBlasi family (Vince '78, Robi, Richard and William).
coin of the realm. He is stunningly brilliant and among the greatest craftsman in the law. He also has wisdom and judgment, qualities not always associated with brilliance. Vince is the kind of person you look to for both professional and personal advice and do so knowing that it would be generously given. Finally, he exudes self-confidence but is utterly without egotism. When he was my student, I knew he was destined for a great career. After graduation, he was, in virtually the blink of an eye, a major litigator in the new field of corporate takeover law. Every encounter with Vince is a pleasant one. He is interesting, has a wonderful sense of humor, and is an all-around good guy.  Someone who doesn’t  know him might ask, “In what way is he a good guy?” I would answer that generosity is his key quality. His generosity extends to material things but also to his spirit. He is generous in his kindness to people, his willingness to share his wisdom, and his ability to entertain. Vince strikes a spark with people that causes them to feel affectionately toward him in a way not ordinarily generated by big-time lawyers, of which he is certainly one. Roberta Romano has already told you who Simeon E. Baldwin was and described his importance to the Yale Law School. Vince richly deserves this award."  

Robert Giuffra, Jr. '87, Partner at Sullivan & Cromwell LLP, added:  "Starting in the 1980s, Vince has been one of the handful of lawyers who have been the go-to litigators in the most high-profile white-collar and securities cases. Vince’s career reads like a history of corporate scandals over the past 35 years. He represented clients in the insider trading cases of the 1980s. The Solomon Brothers Treasury auction scandal. Pay-to-play in the muni securities markets. The Orange County muni bond scandal. Enron. Back-dated options. And more recently all of the financial crisis litigation. Most big-time Wall Street litigators don’t have much good to say about the competition. But if you took a poll among the litigation bar, I think Vince would be voted most popular – by acclimation. And, that’s why Vince was selected by his peers to serve as lead counsel for all the big Wall Street firms in the massive IPO allocation case, arising out of the dot com bust. Vince has been a great mentor to me, and many other partners at S&C. He helped to build our litigation practice.  He’s been a great friend of Yale Law School, serving as chair of the Yale Law School Fund. But I think Vince’s greatest accomplishment is that he’s been a model for many lawyers, including myself.  No matter how busy he was.  He always was going to games at his son’s school. Congrats Vince. I can’t think of a more deserving recipient of the Baldwin Award. "


2012Stephen Fraidin '64, Partner, Corporate, Kirkland & Ellis LLP

In presenting the award, Alan Schwartz '64, Sterling Professor of Law and former Center Director, said: "Stephen’s career has three facets.  First, he is among the best – perhaps the best –M&A lawyer in the country.

Robert Todd Lang '47, Roberta Romano '80, Alan Schwartz '64, Stephen Fraidin '64, Dean Robert Post '77.
His career as an M&A lawyer is characterized by probity, courage and great success.  He tells the truth to clients, and then he manages to keep them. The most distinguishing feature of Stephen’s career, however, is his creativity.  He is among the inventors of modern M&A practice, and he is responsible for many leading innovations. The second facet of Stephen’s career is his teaching.  Stephen has for more than two decades co-taught, mostly with me but also with Professor Romano, a course entitled “The Law and Economics of Corporate Control”.  Stephen is a great, and an inspirational, teacher.  He combines theoretical insights with great practical knowledge to create lucid and illuminating presentations.  Stephen also is a role model for students.  He is the paradigm of a great lawyer: brilliant, knowledgeable, open to new ideas, excited about the practice of law, vivid in portraying its challenges and available to young people for advice and counsel.  The third facet of Stephen’s career is his business interest.  Stephen understands not only the legal but also the economic aspects of the transactions in which he is involved and those he teaches.  His clients rely on him, not only for his legal insights, but also for his sense of whether their goals make sense and whether a client is pursuing those goals in the best way." 


2011Eugene A. Ludwig ’73, Chairman and Founder, Promontory Financial Group, and U.S. Comptroller of the Currency, 1993-98

In presenting the award, Center director Roberta Romano ’80 stated that “Simeon Baldwin's career embodies the distinguished achievement and service in law and business that the Center wishes to recognize and honor in award recipients. 


Dean Robert Post ’77, Eugene A. Ludwig ’73, Roberta Romano ’80, Robert Todd Lang ’47
And like Simeon Baldwin, Gene Ludwig has done it all. He has been a partner at Covington & Burling specializing in a banking practice; Vice Chairman and Senior Control Officer of Bankers’ Trust/Deutsche Bank; and is now the Chairman of Promontory, a leading financial services consulting firm, which he founded in 2001. He was U.S. Comptroller of the Currency from 1993-98, and while in that position, he also served on the Basel Committee on International Bank Supervision, the FDIC’s Board of Directors and was Chairman of the Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation. As Comptroller of the Currency, among other key tasks, he put together the plan that was the Clinton Administration’s successful policy response to getting banks and the economy through the credit crunch of the early 1990's. In addition to his government service, Gene is Secretary and Member of the Board of Directors of the National Academy Foundation, a non-profit organization through which businesses partner with the education community in hundreds of public high schools across the nation to prepare underserved students for college and successful careers in the financial sector. A focus of his work as Comptroller was on national bank investments in community development, a lifelong interest that he has continued not only in his association with the National Academy Foundation but also in his support of the Ludwig Community Development Program at YLS, which provides legal services and other professional consultation services (business, environmental, public health) to community groups, particularly nonprofit organizations involved in affordable housing, banking, and economic development efforts. I think it is accurate to say that Gene Ludwig not only has followed in the footprints of Simeon Baldwin but stands tall in them. YLS is honored to have you as an alumnus.”  


2010: Hon. William B. Chandler. III ’79 LLM, Chancellor, Delaware Court of Chancery

At the presentation of the award, Center director Roberta Romano ’80 remarked:

Roberta Romano ’80, Hon. William Chandler ’79 LLM, Robert Todd Lang ’47, Dean Robert Post ’77, Arthur Fleischer ’58.
 “Following in Simeon Baldwin’s footsteps with a life of public service, Bill Chandler has served for over two decades on the Chancery Court, having been appointed a Vice Chancellor in 1989 and then appointed Chancellor in 1997. One can convincingly make the case that Chancellor Chandler has done more to improve the quality of corporate law than any other contemporary graduate of Yale Law School. One of his important opinions was the Walt Disney litigation over Michael Ovitz’s employment contract. Chancellor Chandler entered into uncharted territory, defining the standard of good faith, and the Delaware Supreme Court adopted his standard word for word. No small feat. Bill Chandler’s opinions are not only well-reasoned and well-crafted, but they are erudite and at times, downright entertaining (or as some put it, “typically colorful”). In fact, according to the Law Blog, Bill Chandler is an “undisputed LB star” because of his “ability to entertain his audience with otherwise, heavy corporate law opinions” with his references to mythology (Cerberus in United Rental) and pop culture (how many court opinions cite a rapper or analogize M&A to video games?) In the pantheon of great Delaware judges, Chancellor Chandler’s place is secure. So we thank you Bill, for the tremendous public service you have provided to the development of corporate law jurisprudence; the Simeon Baldwin award is a small token of the esteem we have for your outstanding work on the bench.”
2009: Arthur Fleischer, Jr. '58, Senior Partner, Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson

At the presentation of the award, Center director Roberta Romano ’80 remarked: “Art Fleischer’s career perfectly captures the qualities of the individual whom we recognize with the Baldwin award, distinguished service across the private, public and non-profit sectors.

Roberta Romano '80, Art Fleischer '58, Dean Robert Post '77, Todd Lang '47
Art is one of the three creators of modern takeover law - along with Marty Lipton of Wachtell Lipton, and Joe Flom of Skadden Arps. He has been a pioneer in the art of engaging in hostile takeovers and defending against them, from the days when such transactions were novel and not being undertaken by many law firms. Art has done more than advise clients, he has also advised academics, students and practitioners, having authored the leading treatise on takeover defenses, which is about to come out in its 7th edition. In addition to being one of the great deals lawyers of his generation, Art has been involved in public service - starting with working at the SEC when a young lawyer as an assistant to the chairman in the early 1960s, through serving on the boards of the American Stock Exchange, and the Whitney Museum of American Art, among other institutions. Art has also been a loyal supporter of the law school, and an active leader in his class reunions. The award recognizes your contributions to corporate law, the betterment of the operation of businesses in the US., and globally, and the Yale Law School. We are privileged that you are our graduate.”


2008: Judge Ralph K. Winter '60, was a member of the Law School faculty from 1962-82, when he was appointed to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. He continues to teach on the faculty part-time.  


Dean Harold Hongju Koh, Ralph Winter '60, Todd Lang '47, Roberta Romano '80.

At the presentation of the award, Center director Roberta Romano ’80 stated that  Judge Winter was awarded the Simeon E. Baldwin Award in recognition of his foundational contributions to corporate law as a scholar and jurist. His pathbreaking 1977 article, "State Law, Shareholder Protection, and the Theory of the Corporation," challenged the prevailing understanding of state corporate law as a "race for the bottom" and transformed the debate, by using economic analysis to identify fundamental flaws in the dominant reasoning that failed to recognize the impact of markets on behavior. It is difficult to appreciate how novel and controversial the article's approach was from today's vantage point, as the economic mode of analysis, which was against the grain of the then-existing literature, is now mainstream. The 1977 article continues to be read and cited, with 10 percent of its over 200 citations, having been in 2007-08 publications; this is a rare achievement. Ralph Winter has also continued to influence corporate law from the bench: For example, to understand the Business Judgment Rule, the keystone of the liability regime for corporate directors, a lawyer has to read his opinion in Joy v. North.


2007: Robert Todd Lang '47 , Chairman of the YLS Center for the Study of Corporate Law's Board of Advisors, and Senior Partner, Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP

Robert Todd Lang '47, chairman of the Center’s Board of Advisors, was the recipient of the first Simeon E. Baldwin Award for Distinguished Service in Law and Business. A senior partner of Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP, Lang was the driving force behind the creation of the Center. Roberta Romano '80, Center director remarked on the occasion of his receiving the award:

"Baldwin's career embodies what we wish to recognize and honor in the award recipient, and he would have recognized a kindred spirit in Todd Lang.

Roberta Romano ‘80, Todd Lang ‘47, Dean Harold Hongju Koh.
Todd is not just one of the great corporate lawyers of his generation, but he has also worked tirelessly on every important bar committee and task force on corporate governance and securities regulation over the past several decades. As a consequence, the benefit of his wisdom has gone far beyond his clients; our laws are infinitely better for Todd's efforts. Todd has also been a steadfast friend of YLS who had both the vision to recognize the need for a corporate law center at the law school when none existed in the country, and the generosity to get such a project off the ground. Students, faculty and alumni in the law and business area have all been the beneficiaries of Todd's foresight and generosity, which has enriched students' educational experience and faculty research, and fostered interaction among students, faculty and graduates. It is befitting that Todd is the first recipient of the Simeon Baldwin award that the Corporate Law Center has established to recognize an individual's contribution to law and business."