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2010-2011

From Mad Men to Mad Bots: Advertising in the Digital Age
Yale Law School
March 25-26, 2011

Speakers and Moderators
Thought Pieces

Panels

Advertising is central to the media landscape, and to daily life. As advertisers and audiences migrate to the Internet, mobile phones, and other digital platforms, businesses are harnessing new technologies to reimagine and redesign what advertising is, and how it works. Computing power takes center stage as ads are automatically tailored to match the surrounding content, and individual users are tracked and targeted for a new level of personalized marketing. Advertisers and publishers have new information and new options, while individual users enjoy new benefits and face new risks. How do the new technologies and new business models of advertising work, and how should they change the way we understand media? What do these developments mean for the online privacy debate, and for the special case of youth-oriented media? How do the new advertisements change our self-perceptions and our social behavior online? And how should regulators react? This conference will convene an unusual constellation of business leaders, scholars, activists, and regulators to explore these issues.


Privacy and Innovation Symposium
Yale Law School
October 29, 2010

Panels
Panelists
Thought Pieces

The Yale Information Society Project is pleased to announce the Privacy and Innovation Symposium, scheduled to take place on October 29, 2010 from 1:00-5:30 p.m. in Room 127 of Yale Law School. Sponsored by the Kauffman Foundation, the symposium will bring together leading scholars to explore the relationship between privacy and innovation. Panelists will discuss how the need to protect privacy can promote technological innovation in industries ranging from healthcare to digital commerce. They will examine privacy issues in the context of Web 2.0 and social networking platforms, discussing how these technologies should be designed to promote user autonomy, personal privacy, and transparency of operations. Finally, the panelists will discuss how innovations designed to protect privacy can promote freedom of expression and freedom of expression.