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Lindsey Luebchow ’11 and Arthur Plews ’11 Awarded Heyman Fellowships

The Heyman Federal Public Service Fellowship Program has announced the recipients of the 2011-2012 Heyman Fellowships—Lindsey Luebchow ’11 and Arthur Plews ’11. Luebchow will work jointly with the assistant secretaries of the Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development and the Office of Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Education, and Plews will work in the office of Susan Rice, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations.

Lindsey Luebchow is a member of the Yale Law School class of 2011. She graduated summa cum laude from Duke University in 2006. Her commitment to education advocacy is longstanding. Prior to attending law school, she worked as an education policy analyst with the Education Policy Program of the New America Foundation. During her three years of law school, she has consistently worked on issues of education advocacy and school reform. As a Heyman Fellow, she will work in two offices of the U.S. Department of Education: the Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development under Assistant Secretary Carmel Martin, and the Office of Civil Rights, under Assistant Secretary Russlynn Ali. In her position, Luebchow will be responsible for analyzing and supporting the Department of Education’s efforts to integrate policy development and civil rights priorities in order to improve the quality of educational opportunities available to minority children.

Arthur Plews is a member of the Yale Law School class of 2011. He graduated magna cum laude from Princeton University with a degree from the Wilson School for Public and International Affairs. He will spend his Heyman year in the Washington, D.C. office of Susan Rice, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. He will put his previous experiences and expertise in human rights, international public health, and African affairs to work as a member of Ambassador Rice’s policy and speechwriting staff.

The Heyman Federal Public Service Fellowship Program was created in 2005 through the generosity of Samuel and Ronnie Heyman as part of Yale Law School’s longstanding commitment to public service, including service in the federal government. These one-year fellowships allow recent Yale Law School graduates to work closely with high-level leaders in the U.S. government. The goal of the fellowship is to inspire a new generation to serve by allowing Law School alumni to explore careers in public service and to bring creative, entrepreneurial ideas to the federal government.

The Heyman Federal Public Service Fellowship Program is just one of an array of post-graduate fellowship programs at Yale Law School that include the Arthur Liman Public Interest Fellowship; the Robert L. Bernstein Fellowships in International Human Rights; the YLS Public Interest Fellowship Program (YPIF); and the Robina Foundation Human Rights Fellowship Initiative. These fellowships, along with Yale’s generous and flexible post-graduate loan forgiveness program known as COAP (Career Options Assistance Program), were created to help Yale Law School graduates launch and maintain public interest careers in a host of settings, even in economically challenging times.