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Owen Fiss Article Added to Shapiro’s Most-Cited Law Review Articles; Fiss Now Tied for Record Number of Articles on All-Time List

NOTE--Fred R. Shapiro and Michelle Pearse's study of "The Most-Cited Law Review Articles of All Time," 110 Mich. L. Rev. 1483 (2012), omitted an article: Owen M. Fiss, Groups and the Equal Protection Clause, 5 Phil. & Pub. Aff. 107 (1976), should have been listed in 72nd place (with 729 citations) in Table I, Most-Cited Law Review Articles of All Time. The "Groups" article fell into the category of articles published in nonlegal journals with over 50% of citations to them occurring in legal journals (described on pages 1487-88 of the study), a category that by its nature was impossible for Mr. Shapiro to capture completely comprehensively. With this correction, Professor Fiss enters into a tie with Frank Michelman as the only scholars with 4 articles on that all-time list. The full corrected all-time list will be posted at www.michiganlawreview.org.

The Michigan Law Review has published an article by YLS associate librarian Fred Shapiro (co-authored with Michelle Pearse of the Harvard Law Library) in its June 2012 issue. The article updates Shapiro’s 1985 and 1996 studies of the most-cited law review articles by using newer research tools more thorough and more accurate than anything previous. Yale Law School and present and former individual faculty members figure prominently in the results.

In the list of the 100 most-cited law review articles of all time, former dean Guido Calabresi ’58 has the sixth most-cited article. Professor Owen Fiss has the 22nd most-cited piece, as well as the 27th, and is one of only five scholars with three publications on the all-time ranking. Overall, Yale is a very close second to Harvard in where the authors taught at the time of publication of their articles.

There is also a list of the 100 most-cited articles of the last 20 years, intended to reflect the impact of scholarship created in the current era. Professor Akhil Amar ’84 places third among individuals, with four articles on this recent-scholarship list. He is followed by Dean Robert Post ’77 and Professors William Eskridge ’78 and Reva Siegel ’86 – these three are the only authors with three of the most-cited recent articles. Professor Dan Kahan and former Dean Harold Hongju Koh are among those with two of the most heavily cited recent pieces. Professor Christine Jolls co-authored the most-cited article of the last 20 years, and an article by Professor Henry Hansmann ’74 has garnered the most social science citations of any article ever published in a student-edited law review.

Yale Law School is first by a significant margin over any other law school in total number of faculty publications on the recent-articles list, both based on where authors were at time of publication and “where are they now.” Over 25 of the 100 recent articles were written by Yale Law School alumni.