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Boston College Professor Alicia Munnell To Discuss Retirement Issues March 5 and 6

WATCH THE VIDEO OF ALICIA MUNNELL’S LECTURE, “THE WITHDRAWAL OF BUSINESS”

WATCH THE VIDEO OF ALICIA MUNNELL’S LECTURE, “THE IMPLICATIONS FOR THE INDIVIDUAL AND GOVERNMENT”

DOWNLOAD THE PODCASTS

Alicia H. Munnell, the Peter F. Drucker Professor of Management Sciences at Boston College’s Carroll School of Management, will deliver the 2006-2007 Storrs Lectures at Yale Law School on Monday, March 5, and Tuesday, March 6. Her two-part lecture is titled “The Declining Number of Players in the Retirement Income Game,” with the first lecture sub-titled “The Withdrawal of Business” and the second one, “The Implications for the Individual and Government.”

“Retirement issues are in the national spotlight for the Baby-Boom generation, and Alicia Munnell is a noted expert on this topic,” said Yale Law School Dean Harold Hongju Koh.

In her lectures, Professor Munnell will discuss solutions to the challenges of a retirement income system that previously relied on three players—employers, government, and individuals—but now relies on two.

“In recent years, employers have withdrawn from the system,” said Munnell. “This withdrawal has occurred just as the task of accumulating adequate retirement income has gotten harder due to a rapidly changing landscape. The new landscape is characterized by a rising Social Security retirement age, a sharp decline in traditional pensions coupled with modest 401(k) balances, low savings rates, and longer life spans.”

Both lectures begin at 4:30 p.m. in the Faculty Lounge of the Law School and are free and open to the public. A reception will be held in the Alumni Reading Room following Monday’s lecture. 

Alicia Munnell serves as the director of the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Before joining B.C. in 1997, she was a member of the President's Council of Economic Advisers and Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Economic Policy.

She has published many articles, authored numerous books, and edited several volumes on tax policy, Social Security, public and private pensions, and productivity.  She was co-founder and first president of the National Academy of Social Insurance and is currently a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Institute of Medicine and the Pension Research Council at Wharton.

She holds a B.A. from Wellesley College, an M.A. from Boston University and a Ph.D. from Harvard University.

The Storrs Lectures, one of Yale Law School's oldest and most prestigious lecture programs, were established in 1889. These annual lectures are given by a prominent scholar and deal with fundamental problems of law and jurisprudence.