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Oil in the Amazon: A Toxic Legacy

Manuel Pallares Carrion is a biologist, GIS-mapping expert, and director of public policy initiatives for Esperanza International, Inc., where he oversees the development of pollution prevention, remediation, and environmental restoration statutes for the Republic of Ecuador.  Mr. Carrion is currently working with the Yale Environmental Law Clinic and will speak on legal responses to the social and environmental consequences of oil extraction in Ecuador.  Bring a lunch and join what should be a fascinating discussion.

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Manuel Pallares Carrion, M.S., a biologist and GIS satellite-mapping expert, currently serves as the director of public policy initiatives for Esperanza International, Inc., where he oversees the development of the pollution prevention, remediation and environmental restoration statutes for the republic of Ecuador. Previously, Mr. Pallares established and served as Director of the Environmental and Social Reparation Fund within Ecuador's Ministry of the Environment where he oversaw a $40 million (US) budget. As an expert on the Secoya culture, with 18 years experience working in the northern Amazon region of Ecuador, Mr. Pallares is an authority on the multifaceted impact of oil production upon indigenous populations. Formerly Mr. Pallares coordinated an initiative funded jointly by the European Union and the IBIS Foundation of Denmark from 2000-2005 (the Reunification and Cultural Revalorization Project of the Secoya people of Ecuador and Peru). Additionally, with the support of Attorney Cristobal Bonifaz, Mr. Pallares was lead researcher and co–initiator of the class action law suit, Maria Aguinda v. Texaco Inc. Mr. Palllares continues as a crucial consultant in these proceedings, which have gained international recognition for their impact on the practices of multinational oil companies.