Public Interest Law


About Public Interest Law

Yale Law School has a strong tradition of service in the public interest. In addition to the rich curricular offerings, approximately 80 percent of students take part in a clinic during their time at the Law School.

Learn more 

Clinics & Courses

Public Interest Activities

Most YLS students perform public service in activities ranging from legal research and writing to outreach in the New Haven public schools. A number of YLS centers and projects offer fellowships and other opportunities for public service.

Public Interest Activities

Public Interest Career Services

Public Interest Career Services are available through the Career Development Office, which offers specialized counseling, as well as a wide array of services, programs, events, and resources for public interest minded students and alumni in all stages of their career development.

Career Services

Events & Programs

Resources

Public Interest Employers

For Public Interest Employers

Monday, January 09, 2017


In The Press

Gay Air Force Vet Honorably Discharged 68 Years Later

The Hartford Courant

Erin Baldwin ’17 is quoted in an article discussing the case of Hubert Spires, an Air Force veteran denied benefits after being discharged as “undesirable” in 1948 for being gay. Spires’ discharge status was upgraded to honorable last week after a successful legal challenge initiated by the Veterans Legal Services Clinic, which represented Spires.

Saturday, February 18, 2017


Events

Rebellious Lawyering Conference

Saturday, February 18, 2017
(All day)
Sterling Law Building

Thursday, April 6, 2017


Events

Liman Colloquium

Thursday, April 6, 2017
(All day)
Yale Law School

Tuesday, October 25, 2016


1:02:04

Monday, June 6, 2016


1:23

Monday, June 6, 2016


2:32

Tuesday, May 31, 2016


2:03

Monday, May 23, 2016


2:14

Monday, January 9, 2017


In The Press

Gay Air Force Vet Honorably Discharged 68 Years Later

The Hartford Courant

Erin Baldwin ’17 is quoted in an article discussing the case of Hubert Spires, an Air Force veteran denied benefits after being discharged as “undesirable” in 1948 for being gay. Spires’ discharge status was upgraded to honorable last week after a successful legal challenge initiated by the Veterans Legal Services Clinic, which represented Spires.

Tuesday, January 3, 2017


In The Press

Harsh Memories of Raids, Grim Fears for the Future

The New York Times

Deputy Dean for Experiential Education and William O. Douglas Clinical Professor of Law Michael Wishnie ’93 is quoted in an article about potential deportation of undocumented immigrants under the incoming administration.

Saturday, December 31, 2016


In The Press

The Growing Gap Between the U.S. and the International Anti-Death-Penalty Consensus—A Commentary by Lincoln Caplan

NewYorker.com

Lincoln Caplan is a Senior Research Scholar in Law at Yale Law School.

Thursday, December 1, 2016


In The Press

Yale Report Tries To Count People Held In Solitary Confinement

WSHU

Arthur Liman Professor of Law Judith Resnik was interviewed about Aiming to Reduce Time-In-Cell, a report by the Association of State Correctional Administrators and The Liman Program about the effects of solitary confinement.

Wednesday, November 30, 2016


In The Press

Who’s in Solitary Confinement?

The Marshall Project

Arthur Liman Professor of Law Judith Resnik is quoted in an article on Aiming to Reduce Time-In-Cell, a report by the Association of State Correctional Administrators and The Liman Program about the use of solitary confinement. Similar coverage appeared in The Atlantic.

Wednesday, November 30, 2016


In The Press

Will the Supreme Court Stop Texas from Executing the Intellectually Disabled?—A Commentary by Lincoln Caplan

NewYorker.com/ News Desk

Lincoln Caplan is the Truman Capote Visiting Lecturer in Law at Yale Law School.

Alumni & Student Profiles


'02

Beverly Jones

Senior Vice President and Chief Legal Officer, American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, New York, NY

You don’t have to be a lawyer, but you have to be an involved person. You have to care enough about things to do something about them. It doesn’t have to be politics. It can be your church, your school, your community center; however, you want to be involved. What you cannot do is ignore things.”


U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor

Class of 1979