Students in this clinical externship can earn up to 3 units of credit to assist state or federal prosecutors with their responsibilities, both before and at trial. Placements are available in New Haven and surrounding cities and in a variety of fields, including misdemeanors, felonies, or specialized areas such as career criminal, traffic, or appellate work. Weekly sessions will range from discussions of assigned readings to field trips to prisons, police laboratories, etc. Students will be required to keep journals and time records.

Placements at the U.S. Attorney’s Office must be arranged at least four months in advance, to allow time for security clearance procedures. Applications and interviews for the State’s Attorney placements will take place during the first week of the term. Although enrollment is limited and permission of the instructor is required, timing and the involvement of outside agencies remove this clinic from the usual sign-up process for limited enrollment courses.


J.L. Pottenger, Jr.
Kate Stith

Public Interest Law at Yale Law School

Yale Law School has a strong tradition of service in the public interest. Approximately 80 percent of students take part in a clinic during their time at the Law School, and unlike at other law schools, students can engage in clinic activities after the first term.

Ways to Engage

Our Clinics

Yale Law School offers more than two dozen clinics that provide students with hands on, practical experience in the law on a diverse range of subject matters.


Yale Law School offers a suite of innovative simulation courses based on real-world case studies.

Centers and Workshops

Yale Law School enhances the intellectual life of its academic community by sponsoring a variety of centers, programs, and workshops, inspired by the interests of its faculty and students.

In their first semester, all entering students are required to take four courses, one of which must be taken in a small group of 15 or 16 students. Immediately every student in the class has the opportunity to develop a close relationship with one of their four teachers.”

Anthony Kronman

Class of 1975, Sterling Professor of Law and Former Dean